Mononucleosis, or “mono” for short, is a common viral infection. Many teens and young adults will get this virus that spreads almost primarily through the transmission of saliva.

While mono’s symptoms can linger for a long time in some cases, this viral infection isn’t typically considered a serious illness.

Our AFC Urgent Care Hixson team further elaborates on mono below, so keep reading!

What Is Mono?

Mono is often referred to as the “kissing disease” because, like we said earlier, saliva is the most common way the virus is spread. This infection is also very common, as almost 90% of people will come in contact with mono’s main cause, the Epstein-Barr virus, by the age of 35—even though not everyone will experience symptoms.

We’ve listed mono’s most common symptoms below.

Common Mono Symptoms

  • Extreme fatigue
  • Fever
  • Sore throat
  • Head and body aches
  • Swollen lymph nodes in the neck and armpits
  • Swollen liver or spleen or both
  • Rash

Is Mono a Cause for Serious Concern?

Typically, no. While it’s true that mono’s symptoms can linger for months in some cases, most instances of this virus will get better over time without treatment. The typical runtime for a case of mononucleosis is about a month.

After you’re done with the symptoms of mono, the virus will lie dormant in the body. Most people who get mono only have to deal with it once, but in rare cases, the virus can reawaken and cause symptoms again. This is most common among people who have weakened immune systems.

Ways to Prevent Mono

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Maintain a healthy lifestyle, since a healthy individual is better prepared to ward off any virus when exposed.
  • Eat a nutritional diet and get adequate sleep, which is between seven and nine hours each night.
  • Exercise for at least 150 minutes each week, since consistent exercise keeps the body fit and less likely to catch any viral illnesses.

Feeling less than your best? Our AFC Urgent Care Hixson is here for you! Don’t hesitate to visit us today.